Planting Anemone: Grecian Windflowers
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Planting Anemone

Grecian Windflowers
Anemones are a very small bulb which produces daisy-like flowers. They make a nice addition of cheerful color to the low parts and borders of your garden. Most Anemones are planted in the fall, however there are a few varieties that can also be planted in the spring for a late spring/early summer bloom. These bulbs create a great groundcover in full and partial sun areas.
Planting Anemones Outdoors
  1. More vigorous growth and earlier sprouts can be encouraged by soaking your anemone for 2-4 hours in a small cup of water prior to planting. This “pre-planting soak” will get them ready to grow.
  2. Make sure the area you are going to plant in has well drained soil*, and receives full sun.
  3. Anemone bulbs should  be planted at a space of 3-6”
  4. Anemones are small bulbs and should be planted at a depth of 2-3”
  5. Anemone bulbs do not really have a “pointy” or “flat” side and therefore you do not need to be concerned about which side is planted up.
  6. Thoroughly soak the area with water once all the bulbs have been planted. Roots will form in fall and then the bulb will sprout and bloom in spring. Water as needed while the plant is growing and blooming. Do not water during dormant season.
  7. When in bloom, these flowers can be cut and used in fresh flower bouquets. This is not harmful to the plant at all!
  8. After the flowers have died, allow the foliage to yellow and die back. The leaves will continue to gather sunlight and make food for next year’s blooms.
Planting Anemone in Containers
  1. Fill containers with a good quality, well-drained soil. Just as in the ground, be sure that the Anemone bulbs do not sit wet. Adequate drainage holes in the pot are a MUST!
  2. Place containers in a location where they will receive sun most, if not all, of the day.
  3. Anemone bulbs can be spaced close together just as long as they are not touching each other or the sides of the pot.
  4.  Anemones are small bulbs and should be planted at a depth of 2-3”
  5. Anemone bulbs do not really have a “pointy” or “flat” side and therefore you do not need to be concerned about which side is planted up.
  6. Thoroughly soak the container with water once all the bulbs have been planted making sure the water runs out the bottom of the container. Roots will form in fall and then the bulb will sprout and bloom in spring. Water as needed while the plant is growing and blooming.
  7. Anemone need a “cool period” just as tulips and daffodils, etc. however they will not survive if frozen. Therefore, if you live in an area where winters are severe and the ground freezes, the container needs to be moved into a cool place that does not receive frost, such as a garage or cool basement. While bulbs in the ground will be fine since the ground is spread out over a larger area and not as “exposed”, the pot will freeze solid if left out in the elements. If the container is too large or heavy to move inside, bubble wrap or burlap can be used to protect the pot from freezing.
  8. As weather begins to warm up, monitor the container for signs of anemone sprouts. Once the sprouts are seen, move the pot outdoors to a sunny patio or lawn area. If you left your pot outdoors and wrapped it for protection, remove this protection at this time.
  9. Enjoy these lovely flowers in your pot or plant them in the yard at this time.
  10. After the flowers have died, allow the foliage to yellow and die back. The leaves will continue to gather sunlight and make food for next year’s blooms.
  11. Once the foliage has yellowed and dried, it may be removed by gently pulling it out of the soil. If the leaves do not easily pull away from the bulb, they are not ready to be removed. Your anemone bulbs are now dormant and ready to “rest” until next year!
 
 
How do I know if my soil is well-drained?
To know whether or not your soil is well-drained monitor the planting location after it rains. After several hours of a rain shower all precipitation should soak into the soil. If this does not happen a different location should be chosen, or your soil will need to be amended with organic matter such as peat humus, composted manure or compost from your home compost bin. If you are still unsure of your soil content you can send a soil sample to your states extension office for testing. If your soil is high in clay content do NOT add sand to it as this will turn it into concrete. If your soil is sandy and the water drains a bit too well you will want to add peat moss or humus to enrich the soil and increase its water and nutrient holding capacity, which will therefore provide a happy home for your bulbs.